•  Do act if you see kittens or cats with runny noses and eyes sealed shut with pus. This is cat-flu, a disease that requires immediate and long-term treatment. Try to wipe the animal’s eyes clean with Tobrex drops from the chemist, and take to the nearest vet for a course of antibiotics.
  •  Do report poisonings to the police. Poisoning companion animals is illegal under Greek law (4039/2012).
  •  Do take ill or injured street cats to the nearest vet. If you cannot find a vet – or if there isn’t one nearby – contact the local animal welfare group (Animal Action has details for groups in many areas of Greece, ring 00 30 210 384 0010 for more information).
  •  Don’t be frightened that you might catch rabies: the disease has not been seen in cats in Greece since the 1970s.
  •  Don’t feed stray cats from your restaurant table. You could irritate the owners or other customers, which could result in the cats being harmed.
  •  Do keep leftover meat or fish and feed it to stray cats by the nearest rubbish bin or at the kerb underneath a parked car.
  •  Do keep a bag or box of dry cat food with you to feed to any hungry strays you meet.
  •  Do try to make sure that stray cats have access to clean water (in summer, they usually drink from dripping air-conditioning units).
  •  Don’t give cats or kittens milk. It will give them diarrhoea.
  •  Lastly, and most importantly: DO encourage all cat-owners and stray cat-feeders to get their animals neutered. It means a healthier, longer, less dangerous life for the cat, and is the only proven, long-term solution to the stray animal problem.